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News

RUSS granted planning for training Hub and Self Build housing

Rural Urban Synthesis Society (RUSS) has been awarded planning permission for its community-led housing custom build scheme....

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Task Force announces work with London Older Lesbian Cohousing

The Right to Build Task Force is advising London Older Lesbian Cohousing (LOLC), the Task Force's first official work with community-led housing group.

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Dover Community-led Housing, Custom and Self Build Conference

Dover City Council is running a Community-led Housing and Self Build conference on 28 June, bringing together local people wishing to create their own home through the Right to ....

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Check your Right to Build register status following GDPR

With GDPR now in effect, check with your local councils to ensure you've not been removed from your local Right to Build registers. 

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Be inspired with a visit to a show home

Get inspired with a visit to a dedicated show home for an insight into what can be achieved with Self Build, starting with the newly refitted Milchester by Potton, in Cambridges....

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Case Studies

Bath Street Collective Custom Build

Bath Street Collective Custom Build

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Planning for retirement with Potton

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Bakers Shaw

Bakers Shaw mixed build-method Passivhaus

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Beattie Passive house

Manx passive home

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Contemporary Timber Frame Home

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Passivhaus Family Farmhouse

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Steel Farm

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Merlin Haven

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Timber Frame Home, Ventnor

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Aldcliffe Yard, Lancaster

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Walthamstow Social Rent Scheme

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Prefabricated Passivhaus bungalow

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Cookham Dean, Berkshire

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Harvest House

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Bickleigh Eco Village, Devon

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Stoke-on-Trent Serviced Building Plots

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Forevergreen House

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Housing People Building Communities

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Sülzer Freunde, Cologne

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Manor Farm, Kirton

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Straw-baling, Perthshire

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Findhorn

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Almere, Holland

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Hockerton

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Top tips

Charlie Luxton's
Top Tip

Charlie Luxton's  Top Tip Read more

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Independent community collaboration

Benefits

  • It is one of the lowest cost routes to self build - typically saving 40% on plot costs and an extra 10% on building costs
  • You get to know your neighbours as you do it
  • In most cases you have flexibility over the design of your home and how you build it
  • You can influence the wider area too - so you might also include communal play areas for your children, allotments or other features as part of the overall scheme
 

Challenges

  • It can take time to get a group together, and to get a clear consensus on how to use a larger site; sometimes there can be disagreements that are tricky to resolve.
  • It can be difficult to raise the finance to buy a larger site. Some people may let you down - for example they may not finish their home as fast as everyone else, or 'pull their weight' on communal tasks.

WHAT YOU USUALLY HAVE TO DO TO GET A GROUP PROJECT GOING

  • Recruit some reliable like-minded people (10-20 usually) and form a formal body to represent them.
  • Find a suitable site that everyone is happy with and line up the money to be able to buy it.
  • Agree a plan for splitting the overall site up into individual plots, and the layout of any roads or communal facilities.
  • Agree fair prices for each of the plots.
  • Decide the 'rules' for the group - for example any limits on house heights, or the preferred materials that might be used, any eco-targets you want to achieve, any deadlines for completing homes, if you are going to allow people to live on site while building work is underway, etc etc.

NEXT STEPS...

Quicklinks

Gauge interest on a piece of land

Sometimes people start groups when they spot a piece of land locally that might be ideal for a group self build scheme. So if you know of a potential site find out about its possible availability, and organise a public meeting to gauge the level of interest. You can do this by dropping simple flyers through local people's letter boxes, promoting the meeting online, or by getting your local newspaper to run an article about the meeting. You’ll be amazed at the response this usually gets.

Form a Community Land Trust

The Government's Community Right to Bid may help you acquire public land that's not being productively used. You might also consider setting up a Community Land Trust (CLT). This can be a good option in rural areas where building land is expensive, because CLTs may be permitted to build affordable homes on agricultural land, which can be much cheaper to buy. The National CLT Network has more information on this.

Apply for a grant

If you are hoping to build as part of a group self build scheme you may be eligible for a loan under the Government's Custom Build Investment Fund. To be eligible there has to be at least five homes being built together - more information is available in the full prospectus. Note that a slightly different fund approach is being proposed from the Greater London Authority.

Grants are available to help groups pay for professional advice. Locality has more information, and has also produced an informative document on how community groups can apply for a slice of money through the £17m Community Led Project Support fund, announced by the Government in the early summer of 2013.

Some of the bigger lending institutions may also be worth approaching, though in the current economic climate; it’s very difficult to get finance for group self build schemes.

What else?

Visit the Collective Custom Build website which raises awareness about how people can build homes together.

Go to see some of the most interesting and successful self build group projects (Ashley Vale in Bristol or Findhorn in Scotland, for example) so that you understand how they worked. This will help you to assess the viability of getting a local project off the ground.

You can read more about some successful and innovative community self build projects in Europe here:

There are some training courses run from time to time by EcomotiveThe Centre for Alternative Technology, and The National Self Build and Renovation Centre.

There are many other sources of useful information – such as exhibitions and the various self build magazines.

Case studies

Hockerton

Hockerton

Five families worked together to build these eco homes on land previously zoned for agricultural use. The build cost was around £65,000 each.

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Ashley Vale

Ashley Vale

A group of local people in Bristol clubbed together to build homes for 32 families. The costs ranged from £70,000 to about £150,000.

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Liverpool Habitat for Humanity

Liverpool Habitat for Humanity

A charity building 32 low-cost homes built by volunteers in the Granby-Toxteth district of the city.

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