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News

Budget boost for housing

Chancellor gives housing £44bn commitment in the latest budget

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Virgin Money supports custom build

 Virgin Money is the latest big name to show support for the self ....

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Task Force Announcements

A trio of announcemens, including a new Director for NaCSBA's expert Task Force 

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New Registers to Facilitate Residential Land Supply

Can redeveloping more browfield land help to solve the housing crisis? 

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Self-Build as Housing Market Fix

Capacity in the Homebuilding Industry: How the UK is falling short with self-building 

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Case Studies

Contemporary Timber Frame Home

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Passivhaus Family Farmhouse

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Steel Farm

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Merlin Haven

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Timber Frame Home, Ventnor

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Aldcliffe Yard, Lancaster

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Walthamstow Social Rent Scheme

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Prefabricated Passivhaus bungalow

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Cookham Dean, Berkshire

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Harvest House

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Bickleigh Eco Village, Devon

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Stoke-on-Trent Serviced Building Plots

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Forevergreen House

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Housing People Building Communities

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Sülzer Freunde, Cologne

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Berlin - 'Building Groups'

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Manor Farm, Kirton

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Straw-baling, Perthshire

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Findhorn

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Almere, Holland

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Hockerton

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Top tips

Heating

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How to be your own project manager

HOw to be your own project manager
  • Project managing sounds very professional and difficult but it is in fact what anyone running a building firm does all the time. Arranging sub-contracters to come in on the right day, and checking that they know what to do; organsing materials; co-ordinating with architects and building inspectors, keeping the site safe and tidy and secure; and keeping the client happy. A DIY project manager does all these except the last.
  • You need time and energy to do your own project management. Experience and contacts are also useful but not essential.
  • Ask yourself “Could I sack someone?” If not, maybe you aren’t cut out for this.
  • As a rule, it takes about one hour of project management for every seven hours worked “on the tools.” So if you have three people working on site (say for a total 24 hours a day), you will need to spend two to three hours managing the process, of which ideally one hour should be spent on site.
  • Don’t undertake DIY project management unless you can be on site at least once a day most days. Don’t even think about it if you are living more than an hour from site.
  • If you have more time to spare, then don’t sit around on site doing nothing. Become a labourer. Or lift up a broom. But don’t stand around talking to (and watching) your sub-contractors — this will slow them down and wind them up.
  • If you don’t know what you are doing, get help from someone who does.